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have posted and explanations. so i will talk to you very thatly about the nsa, and is something i have been very involved with, trying to rein in the out-of-control nature of what is going on right now with our surveillance programs, and that is something that i have spent, as you have probably seen from the news, a lot of time doing over the past couple of months. doing himsa has been as has been declassified now, is collecting the phone records of every single person in the united states, regardless of whether you are under suspicion of anything, so, in other words, the nsa has a database, and they actually collect every time you call someone. they collect the call that was made. they tell you which numbers were connected, the duration of the call, and they keep other sorts onwhat they call metadata your calls. they have been doing this for quite some time, but it was thently disclosed, and problem, of course, is they are doing it without any suspicion. it does not matter if you have a connection to a terrorist or not. they decided that they have the authority to gather up everyone's
for joining us bright and early. another nsa spying bombshell. not only did they break thousands of laws while watching americans, but they claim they did it all by mistake. this is the scandal that keeps getting worse. we'll explain it. >> muslim groups planning a million muslim march set to take place on, get, this 9/11. why? because they say they are the real victims of that attack. >> clayton: take a look at this. a woman not doing any favor to her genders. repeated attempted to exit the garage. ms. al con camerota. it goes on for liar like a minute. she gets out. yeah. that's not going to work. does this prove that women can't drive? we're going to debate it next. "fox & friends" begins right now. hi. my name is alexandra, you are watching my favorite show. "fox & friends." >> alisyn: that's my daughter. >> is it really her favorite show? >> alisyn: it is her favorite show but i would never let her watch it. >> clayton: sounds like a character from the disney show. >> alisyn: i didn't know she recorded that my 8-year-old daughter is with us today she asleep at the moment. >> clayton: it's
shows and lon snowden, father of edward snowden, the n.s.a. leaker, was on some of the chat shows and he was responding to what the president said during his press conference the day before about his son. i know eric, you're close to this story. you've spoken to the father before. >>eric: i have. i've spoken to lon personally. he's very concerned, a concerned father. he's also a concerned american. he's worried about what's going on. listen to what he had to say. he was with his attorney on one of the talk shows. >> at this point what i would like is for this to be vetted in open court for the american people to have all the facts. what i've seen is much political theater. i was dis pointed in the president's press conference. i believe that's driven by his clear understanding that the american people are absolutely unhappy with what they've learned and that more is going to be forthcoming. we do have a perception problem and we have to deal with that. we need to let the american public know that this program is a program that protects them but does not violate their privacy. for an indi
exposed by n.s.a. leaker edward snowden and it is much more broad than first thought. >> google and football could make a play to be part of the >> covering cupertino, wine country and all bay area this is abc7 news. >> taking a look from our mount tamalpais camera, a beautiful wednesday morning. mike nuclear -- mike nicco will have the latest the. >> bo biden has been admitted to a cancer center in houston, he has a mass on his brain he was hospitalized after feeling weak on a long drive to indiana after being treated at hospitals in chicago and philadelphia, the 44-year-old biden unwent tests in houston and suffered a mild stroke in 2010. >> new this morning the federal government is working on a new surveillance camera system that would automatically be able to identify people by their faces. "new york times" today reports that the department of homeland security is testing the project called biometric optical surveillance system that is reportedly not ready for use but critics are sounding an alarm saying rules need to be set on how the new technology will be used. >> also,
in the -- matt here.matth ols olson is the current director of ct. nt foras been general counsel the nsa, acting assistant attorney general for national security, and special counsel to the fbi director. his predecessor at the end ctc -- the nctc is mike leiter. he was the second director of the national counterterrorism center until 2011. he is now senior counselor to the ceo of the data analytics alantir technologies. he is also a national security analyst for nbc news. why don't we begin with a very ,road question, and that is what is the current state of the threat from terrorism? where does it emanate from and how serious is it? why don't we start with you? >> it is great to be here. it is daunting to talk about it. we have talked about a lot of subjects today. i will give it a shot. i would say right off of the top the threat is very different now for what it was 10 years ago and even 4 years ago. thinking at a couple of different levels. as have been noted, the threat from al qaeda and afghanistan is really significantly degrading. we do not face the same rate as the same attack as 9/11.
on a wide range of issues, including u.s.-russia relations and likely the nsa surveillance programs. indications are that he will make some sort of statement of the top of the news conference and it is likely to be about the nsa. the new york times" says at resident plans to launch new efforts. the president is endorsing a new policy panel to review surveillance powers. independent attorney to argue against the government before the surveillance courts. so some of the things that we're likely to hear but as the resident begins the news conference this afternoon. it will -- as the president begins the news conference this afternoon. after the news conference is done, we plan to open up our phones than hear from you. [captioning performed by national captioning institute] [captions copyright national cable satellite corp. 2013] afternoon, everybody, please have a seat. over the past few weeks, i have been talking about what i believe should be our priorities for the country. i am focused on the number one responsibility as commander-in- chief, keeping the american people safe. in rece
asked about the nsa data collection program. he also got a question about same-sex marriage. here is a look. about allso worried the gay rights stuff, like i am thinking like this could be another races and a, where it is like the same thing, but gays and non-gays am a big fight and who really cares? -- does itlly matter really matter? >> that is a great point. do not believe the government should be involved in deciding who can get married. i think that is not an appropriate role for the federal government. foran appropriate role government. marriage is a private institution. i am an orthodox christian. my wife and i do not need government telling us that we can get married. nobody else needs the government telling them that they can get married. this is up to them. i agree with you. of awas a brief part recent town hall meeting. we will show you the entire event tonight starting at 5:45 earlier today, we should do an event with texas senator ted cruz and a couple of items on the agenda for republicans in the near future. he also made news of his own today related to his birth re
the nsa a is not operating these microphones clearly. [laughter] or maybe barack obama is. that's a good point. it's wonderful to be here tonight. wonderful to be here at the steam boat institute. i think it's long past time that the aspen institute got a doze of truth and reality and facts. [applause] and we're thrilled to be part of that effort here tonight. we thought we would do a cup of things. we want to talk about current events, but the most important current event in our lives in our family has been the fact that my dad was bless -- we were all blessed. my dad was a recipient a of new heart a little over a year ago. [applause] and his story, you know, he talked about his first campaign for office when he was elected, and 1967, when i was running the first time was also the first time he had a heart attack, and i've been going back for reasons you can imagine looking at some old news clippings about political campaigns in wyoming, and came across one where my dad was asked about his heart attack in 1978. after he had the attack and decided he was going stay in the race he was int
the bill barring the nsa from using funds to collect the data records from citizens on the subject and investigation. >> she's my chief of staff. he doesn't just work for me. if you have questions or concerns here in the district you can always reach ben. he is primarily in my grand rapids office. you can find that on my website, amash.house.gov. we have a satellite office in battle creek so if there's something you would like to schedule, an appointment you'd like to schedule if you contact the grand rapids office we can make sure we have someone here to meet with you as well in calhoun county. my district director is jordan bush. he is also a valuable resource. if you want to contact my grand rapids office, feel free to do so. he's always around except for today but for good cause he's not here today. but he is a great resources with any number of issues. i do telephone town halls from time to time. so if you would like to get out those phone calls please let the staff know. you can talk to ben before you leave. as we do those from time to time that gives you another way to stay
fighter program. art probably nsa ch looks like. "washington journal" is live every day as 7 a.m. eastern. >> let's begin with a very well- known novelist. what brought you? thiswas born a negro in country and welcome deeply. there was no reason not to be involved what is considered the most important and most noted demonstration to free americans. until recently, like most americans, i have expressed my support of civil rights by talking largely about at cocktail parties. summer,y americans this i could no longer pay lip service to a cause that was urgently right and in a time that is so urgently now. tvsunday, american history marks the 50th anniversary of the march on washington with historic and contemporary roundtable discussions. we will have a visit to that gallery, a theater performance of the 1960s civil rights movements. it starts at 1 p.m. eastern, part of american history tv come every weekend on c-span 3. next is a discussion about the state of the u.s. economy with a former white house economic adviser and the ceo of him co-, the largest bond fund in the world, and chairman
to nsa leaker edward snowden. my next guest said it's the right direction but can't undo five years the president spent remaking the image into one perceived around the globe as weak. fox news contributor linda chavez. thanks for joining us this morning. >> great to be with you. >> i think a lot of people voted for president obama in 2008 the first time with the sincere expectation his election would make america more popular around the globe. that hasn't happened. why? >> it hasn't happened. the president said he was going to remake america's image in the world. i think a lot of people thought because he did have a charismatic personality, certainly the president himself believes himself to be charismatic, he was going to be able to win more friends for america, that america would suddenly be beloved by all. what the president seems not to understand, what is most important in terms of a country's standing is that you are respected not necessarily liked. so the president's effort to make everyone like us i think has made us look weak. >> so it's had the opposite effect? >> that's e
-- on foreign-policy, -- this headline from "the washington post" -- -- that is the nsa leaks, the former nsa staffer, edward snowden, the reporter who first worked on that. there will be more on that story in today's new york times. on our democratic line from pennsylvania. pat, we are talking the president's priorities. we have gone over a few foreign- policy issues. what do you think the top priority should be, foreign or domestic policy? the top priority should be foreign-policy. in particular, a complete disconnection from the state of israel, which we are now finding is a nation leading israeli intelligence officers. these are the american equivalent of the fbi director, cia director, who are now creating a state of israel like not to germany. when secretary kerry detained the leading state department ,fficial of the united states the statement was, at least i can go where i want now. host: where are you getting your information? caller: i know this for a fact. there are photographs of netanyahu on the walls. host: how do you know this as a fact? explain where you get your facts from. c
which is the nsa who every three months is going to this fisa court which is a secret court which no one can appeal to. and they're getting warrants to get cell phone records basically every single american, okay? you have an fbi who believes that and has went to court to say that they do not, they don't need, basically they don't need a warrant to put a gps tracking device on your car. you've got an irs whose official position is that they don't need a warrant to check your e-mail. this, of course, is that same irs that has no compunction about using -- abusing their authority. they have targeted tea party groups and so far nobody has really paid a price for that. and so read the situation that i find, i think i'm and i might be the only person who feels it is about nothing is being done to rein in these government agencies. and so from my perspective it's like, well, the only privacy really have is what the government says that you have to. and i was really pumped when you voted against -- that was awesome, i was really happy about that. i was really disappointed that you voted against
the ramification of the nsa/prism issue as that continues to be a topic of concern in europe. russia will clearly be a topic ask be, of course, syria, egypt, the middle east and the unrest there. so i believe you'll see a very fulsome bilateral conversation within the nordic state, and i think it's an excellent preparation to get the president ready as he travels to st. petersburg to meet with his g8 -- g20, excuse me, colleagues. and, matt, i'll let you take the baton. >> let me introduce matt really quickly. matt goodman holds our william simon chair in political economy. the sigh hon chair examines current issues this international economic policy with a lahr focus on the asia pacific. but i should also say that matt previously served as the white house coordinator for the east asia summit, for the asia-pacific summit many, but he also served as director on the nsc staff and was responsible for the g20, g8 and other international forums. and with that, i'd like to introduce my colleague, matt goodman. >> thank you, ann i drew. hank, heather. so the president will be participating in the eighth
questions about his canceled meeting with russian president putin as well as the debt ceiling and nsa surveillance. we will bring it to you live at 3:00 p.m. eastern on c-span. next, former president george w. bush on immigration during a naturalization ceremony at the bush institute on july 10. following the ceremony, the institute hosted a series of panels looking at immigrant contributions to america. this is about two hours. >> wonderful. for theu, jim, introduction. thank you, ambassador. thank you immigrants who are joining us today and thank you to our audience here and watching us. this is being streamed on bushcenter.org. thank you. mentioned weador are here in texas. this is a relevant topic. it is relevant to american nationwide. especially to those of us in the lone star state caret it is an interesting comparison. growthject is the 4% project. we are trying to get u.s. gdp doubled rate it is now. in recent times, we have been growing 2.5% per year. we know we can do better. one way we know we can do better is that in the past we have grown a lot faster. over the past4% 60
at the fisa debate. a lot of people looked at other stories we wrote about fisa, and about nsa spying and that sort of thing. it put a human face, i think, on the otherwise inpenetrable government bureaucracy system going on. nobody ever really stands exactly -- don't understand what is going on when nsa decides to tap someone's phone. and it was a nice way to sort of show that to people. >> i agree with john when he mentioned that people seem to be more plugged in to politics now than they have ever been. there are part of the explosion of media outlet on capitol hill covering politics since 2006, 2007.ort what you see is that people are only going places that reenforce their already-held opinions. so it's important -- we all -- all of our organizations do really well, is to provide an independent viewpoint or independent look at what is going on in in washington that is simplified enough for the common person, the nonpolitical person to understand but nuanced enough that, you know, you're not boiling it down to something where they're not getting anything out of it. like, i was talk
-span.org. he was also asked about the nsa surveillance program. >> each night this weekend c-span2, while congress is on break, we're showing on four presentations of q&a. today, nobel peace prize winner jody williams. she won the prize in 1997 for her efforts towards a worldwide ban on landmines. then at 8 p.m. eastern booktv prime time. tonight, the focus is on what booktv viewers are reading this summer. >> over this congressional recess, the service employees international union is lobbying to convince congress to pass immigration reform. this morning from washington to talk with one of the union's leaders about why they're doing that. this is about half an hour. >> host: our focus is immigration and our guest is eliseo medina who is the secretary-treasurer of the service employees international union. thanks so much for being with us. >> guest: thank you so much for having me. >> host: as a look at the debate over immigration and it is front and center in the august recess as members of congress traveled to the respective states and congressional districts, what do you think the immi
Search Results 0 to 18 of about 19 (some duplicates have been removed)

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